First Aid Equipment

Once an assessment of first-aid needs has been carried out, the findings can be used to decide what first-aid equipment should be provided in the workplace.

The assessment may indicate that additional materials and equipment are required such as scissors, hypoallergenic microrpous adhesive tape, disposable aprons and individually wrapped, moist wipes. They may be put in the first-aid box or stored separately.

British Standard BS 8599

This standard recommends the correct number of plasters etc for small, medium, large or travel-size kits and also recommends how many kits are needed depending on the size of the organization. Conformity to the standard will mean that anyone using the kit, and patients, are protected from inferior first aid materials.

Compliance with this standard demonstrates that your kits are a better product and enable customers to better meet their heath and safety obligations under the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) guidelines.

Contents of British Standard Compliant (BS 8599-1)
First Aid Kits for the Workplace

First Aid Kit Checks and Restocking

Most companies buy first aid kits but give little thought about restocking it. 

Do you have a restock supply? When a first aid kit is used it should be replenished immediately afterwards so it is ready for use.

Regular checks should be conducted looking for the following:

  • Packets are sealed (any blown packets are to be thrown away)

  • All items are in date

  • Kit does not contain used items

  • Correct quantities as per contents list

Automated External Defribilator

(AED)

There is no specific legal requirement for employers to provide defibrillators in the workplace however a decision should be made after conducting a well-documented risk assessment at the site in question. As part of this assessment it is quite appropriate to consider the risk of a cardiac arrest occurring in the workplace and investing in automated external defibrillators (AED).

Considerations:

  1. The likelihood of an event occurring.

  2. The consequences or severity if the event actually occurred.

The HSE provides guidelines on what should be considered when assessing first aid needs. To supplement this, the Resuscitation Council also provides guidance. For example, important factors to consider when assessing the risk of cardiac arrest will include the number of people using a facility and the risk of cardiac arrest occurring at the site.

Current international resuscitation guidelines advise that evidence supports the establishment of public access defibrillation programmes with the installation of an automated external defibrillator when the:

  • frequency of cardiac arrest is such that there is a reasonable probability of the use of an AED at least once in two years

  • time from call out of the conventional ambulance service to delivery of a shock cannot reliably be achieved within five minutes

  • time from collapse of a victim until the on-site AED can be brought is less than five minutes.

1. The likelihood of cardiac arrest occurring

The risk of an arrest occurring varies according to several factors, each of which should be considered when assigning the score.

  • The number of people passing through the site/footfall. 

  • The age of those present

  • The nature of the location - attendance time of ambulance service

2.The consequences (severity) of cardiac arrest occurring

However, cardiac arrest is uniformly fatal (unless treated)

Management of risk of cardiac arrest

The best chance of successful resuscitation will be when defibrillation and other first aid procedures are carried out with the minimum delay (ideally within in the first three minutes)

Free Defibrillator?

You can play a vital role in helping save lives in your local community by applying online for funding to have a Public Access Defibrillator (PAD) and Call Push Rescue training kit community package in your area.

Your nearest Defibrillator?

You can play a vital role in helping save lives in your local community by applying online for funding to have a Public Access Defibrillator (PAD) and Call Push Rescue training kit community package in your area.